Flash Fiction (17) – Music in Her Ears

Prompt from Quill Shiv, go check it out to read other takes on this prompt.

Music in Her Ears

They haunted her, the echoes of refrains long since silenced.  Any quick turn of her head let her capture the faintest glimmer of light but then it was gone.  The music, the conversation, the glow, and the luster eluded her.

She was trapped in a cocoon of quiet, a world of grays.  She held on to her memories of vivid colors and bright sounds.  But even so, they slipped away.  She reached out, grasping, yearning.  She kicked and fought.  She shouted her defiance.  But it was muffled and choked out by silence.

Unable to remember what she was fighting for, what she was holding on to, she relaxed.  She slipped into the warm comfort of stillness.  Of sameness.

Sounds Like Blackberries – a reblog

This is crazy! In the best most interesting way.

Annie Cardi

A lot of times, writers rely on sensory details to create vivid worlds for their characters. Sometimes it’s fun to use synesthesia and mix the senses. But it’s not just an artistic tool or neurological condition. Apparently this combination of senses is something we all do to some degree.

Scientists studying this link found that people can generally link specific tastes with specific sounds:

“Blindfolded or not, significant associations emerged. Few subjects linked brass with blackberry, for example, but many associated it with piano. Hardly anybody connected piano with musk, but many linked it to brass. Fruit odors were consistently associated with high pitched notes. That confirmed an earlier study by Crisinel and Spence showing that sweet and sour flavors were also associated with high pitched notes.

This effect apparently works the other way, too. Another scientist recently asked different musicians to play pieces of music with adjectives like “bitter,”…

View original post 41 more words